POI Section

The Skyroads to Peace

On September 14, Saudi Arabia’s major oil facilities were attacked by drones and caught on fire.1 
 It is nothing new that drones did harm humanity. According to the articles published in 2015 by the online news organization “The Intercept”, nearly 90 percent of the people killed by US military drone attacks in Afghanistan and the Middle East in the early 2010s are civilians, that is, not the intended targets.2 This is in contrast to the US military’s claim that drones are being used in precision bombing, targeting terror suspects and do only little harm to civilians. 
 National Bird (Sonia Kennebeck, 2016), the feature-length documentary film which is never before shown at the Korean film festivals, denounces the drone as a war weapon. But the director’s question does not stop here. Are drones just bad? How should they be used and what is their role today? In a positive sense, drones have become a vi- tal part of our daily lives, making our lives richer and comforta- ble. Becoming our eyes, ears, hands and feet, drones have now proven their usefulness in many fields, such as architecture, ag- riculture, journalism, and art. And, above all, the advancement and generalization of drone technology can be a driving force of peace unlike the two examples mentioned at the beginning.
 The “right use” of drones in war is still a big controversy and it seems a long road ahead to reaching a social consensus on it. But out- side the war, people have already begun to use them as tools for peace, exploring the potential of drones in new and innovative ways. Drones are willing to go around all over the world to ex- pose reality and to save Kenya’s endangered elephants suffering from poaching and whales entangled in fishing gear. 
The other expression of peace, which refers to a state of tranquility and harmony, is coexistence. The earth is not a home shared only by human beings. In it are countless living creatures sprouting and breathing.
 The Skyroads to Peace pioneered by drones have just taken its first step. Like the seamless flow of St-Laurent River in Canada and the job of shell gathering which has always existed, the peaceful landscapes woven by drones will not only remain in our memories..



Jun Huijin, Programmer of the JDFF

1Kim Sungtak (2019, 09, 15) Half of the oil produced in Saudi Arabia was burned down by drone strikes... Alarm on oil price. [Chung-Ang Ilbo]. URL: https://news.joins.com/ article/23577192


2 Chang Hyungu. (2015, 10, 15) 90% of the victims of the current U.S. drone strikes have nothing to do with targets. . https://www.yna.co.kr/view/AKR20151016009900123

POI Section

The Skyroads to Peace

On September 14, Saudi Arabia’s major oil facilities were attacked by drones and caught on fire.1 
 It is nothing new that drones did harm humanity. According to the articles published in 2015 by the online news organization “The Intercept”, nearly 90 percent of the people killed by US military drone attacks in Afghanistan and the Middle East in the early 2010s are civilians, that is, not the intended targets.2 This is in contrast to the US military’s claim that drones are being used in precision bombing, targeting terror suspects and do only little harm to civilians. 
 National Bird (Sonia Kennebeck, 2016), the feature-length documentary film which is never before shown at the Korean film festivals, denounces the drone as a war weapon. But the director’s question does not stop here. Are drones just bad? How should they be used and what is their role today? In a positive sense, drones have become a vi- tal part of our daily lives, making our lives richer and comforta- ble. Becoming our eyes, ears, hands and feet, drones have now proven their usefulness in many fields, such as architecture, ag- riculture, journalism, and art. And, above all, the advancement and generalization of drone technology can be a driving force of peace unlike the two examples mentioned at the beginning.
 The “right use” of drones in war is still a big controversy and it seems a long road ahead to reaching a social consensus on it. But out- side the war, people have already begun to use them as tools for peace, exploring the potential of drones in new and innovative ways. Drones are willing to go around all over the world to ex- pose reality and to save Kenya’s endangered elephants suffering from poaching and whales entangled in fishing gear. 
The other expression of peace, which refers to a state of tranquility and harmony, is coexistence. The earth is not a home shared only by human beings. In it are countless living creatures sprouting and breathing.
 The Skyroads to Peace pioneered by drones have just taken its first step. Like the seamless flow of St-Laurent River in Canada and the job of shell gathering which has always existed, the peaceful landscapes woven by drones will not only remain in our memories..



Jun Huijin, Programmer of the JDFF

1Kim Sungtak (2019, 09, 15) Half of the oil produced in Saudi Arabia was burned down by drone strikes... Alarm on oil price. [Chung-Ang Ilbo]. URL: https://news.joins.com/ article/23577192


2 Chang Hyungu. (2015, 10, 15) 90% of the victims of the current U.S. drone strikes have nothing to do with targets. . https://www.yna.co.kr/view/AKR20151016009900123

       

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Organized by JDFF Organization Committee

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